Feb 052018
 

Each generation applies fundamental characteristics of leadership in their own unique way. Trust is one of those characteristics that is noticeably different between generations. Each generation views it as an important leadership quality, they just look at it differently. The Millennial generation has a reputation for being open, self-assured, hopeful, well educated, and goal oriented. Millennials have benefited from each of the three older generations, learning allegiance and trust in organizations from Traditionalists, confidence and optimism from Baby Boomers, and a healthy dose of skepticism from Generation X. Millennials refocused the allegiance and trust in organizations they learned from Traditionalists to allegiance and trust in relationships. The confidence and optimism they learned from Baby Boomers helped Millennials turn the skepticism they learned from Generation X into an ability to look at the present more realistically than Baby Boomers, while still maintaining a positive outlook about the future.

Honesty and trust may be more important than ever in today’s world of social media and increased speed and breadth of communications. Leaders must quickly learn who they can trust in a world where messages and reputations are open to many viewers. This transparency leads to an understanding of the reasons behind a leader’s actions, which need to be for the right motivation, or the trust will be lost.

As an essential characteristic of leadership, there are three components of trust in the view of the Millennial leader:

  1. The organization’s vision should be trustworthy for all involved, i.e. for the greater good.
  2. Leadership is honest and transparent and can be trusted.
  3. Millennials are competent and can be trusted.

Millennials expect a lot of communications and feedback. Those in leadership roles want to know even more about their own performance, their team’s performance, and the company’s. Some recommendations for feedback to Millennials include:

  • Updates on the vision and goals and how it relates to their role
  • Status of their projects, including feedback on project success
  • Individual feedback, with more responsibility after action or success

Millennial leaders often value the role of a coach or other role model in encouraging them to step into a leadership role or to recognize they were viewed as a leader and to embrace it. An additional aspect of the coach as a leadership influence is the disillusionment of learning, as these Millennial leaders have become adult leaders, that not all coaches are good, honest, and trustworthy.

Learn more about Millennial leaders and their leadership style by buying my book. Available by clicking the Buy tab above.

Jan 262018
 

Millennial leaders say they are motivated by passion. You may think, what’s the big deal? After all, isn’t everyone more motivated when they are passionate about what they are working on? Yes, but the NEED to be passionate about their work is unique to Millennials compared to older generations. Millennials say passion drives their desire to be inspired to leadership and to accomplish goals. While other generations will agree that having passion for their work or a project is nice, when asked what drives them to be good leaders they are more likely to say accomplishing goals, money, success, family, civic duty, recognition, or a few other things before they say passion. Millennial leaders feel that passion for their work or a goal drives them to be leaders. Frequently it was the passion to accomplish something that made them step into a leadership role.

If you are a manager from another generational group working with a Millennial, you may find this challenging. Why should you care if the Millennial feels passionate about their work? This is their job to self-motivate so they care about being at work every day. But again, Millennials don’t always see it that way. As a group that looks at leaders as people who inspire them, they expect the leaders of their organizations to provide them with the inspiration and enthusiasm that helps promote the passion they should feel for the work they are doing. If their leaders aren’t passionate about the organization, how can the workers be passionate and, in turn, how can they be motivated to do their jobs. It’s just a different way of looking at it. My take on it is that putting some enthusiasm into your work has always had its payback but this is true more than ever if you have Millennials on your team.

My book is now available and the information is on the blog under a different tab. I hope you will find it interesting and helpful if you are in the workplace and trying to understand some of the generational issues in the leadership ranks.

Nov 282017
 

Most Traditionalist leaders have already retired, and each year sees more Baby Boomer leaders reaching retirement age, leaving Generation Xers and Millennials to fill more leadership positions in organizations. Successful organizations will need to begin understanding the leadership style of Millennial leaders in order to hire, motivate, and retain these future leaders. The leaders from the Millennial generational cohort will soon be a dominant factor in the workforce, making it important that today’s leaders begin to understand tomorrow’s leaders.  – Millennials Taking the Lead, The Leadership Style That’s Changing the Workplace is now available through this website and Amazon. Please click on the Buy tab if you would like to purchase the book or go to Amazon. After you read it, please write a review on Amazon so others will buy it!